WHAT WE DO

SERVICES

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PROJECTS

1. According to Feed the Future Ghana Trade and Investment (GTI)’s 2023 Annual Program Statement (GTI-APS-003-2023), agribusiness [small and medium size enterprises] SMEs  which are producers, processors, traders, and service providers have historically been constrained by several problems, including limited size and economies of scale, poor product quality, a lack of diversification and innovation, poor access to credit, cumbersome customs processes, and high costs of associated with agricultural inputs and logistics.

These constraints have the combined effect of deterring competitiveness and export growth; utilization of the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) and the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA); and job creation, particularly among women, youth, and persons with disabilities (marginalized populations).

The underlying challenges to SME growth and diversification include a struggle to recognize the value of [business development service] BDS providers’ services due to high costs and a lack of transparent pricing.

With private sector demand for standards compliance driven by end-market access and the Government of Ghana’s (GOG) strengthened capacity to regulate and enforce adherence to these standards, Ghanaian SMEs have the opportunity to increase exports to the European Union (EU) and access new export markets, such as the United States.

Through technical support from DevAfric, GTI is facilitating solutions to some of the key constraints that 10 target SMEs who operate within GTI’s value chain face.  This facilitation is crucial to addressing operational challenges identified by SMEs so as to promote the growth and profitability of their businesses.

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2. With the help of investment, a group of over 200 smallholder women farmers in the Ho West District of the Volta Region of Ghana (including Mama Ese) will be able to acquire a post-harvest storage facility that meets international standards for safe and hygienic storage of their crops. They will also be able to purchase some of the heavy equipment they need to make their work easier and expand. Such equipment include a tractor (there’s none in the District), a cassava processing machine, a combine harvester, and 16 tricycles. They would also be able to acquire other inputs and employ a professional agriculture officer to give them the required technical support.
Each woman has approximately 5 acres of farm and employes between 4 to 6 laborers made up of mostly other women and youth.

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The corn harvested by Mama Ese, a smallholder corn and cassava farmer in the Ho West District of the Volta Region of Ghana

PIPELINE

DevAfric-GH Ltd.

1. The Feed the Future Ghana Trade and Investment (GTI)

(USAID/Nathan Associates – Anticipated)

Feed the Future Ghana Trade and Investment activity is a five-year project financed by USAID and implemented by Nathan Associates. Agribusiness SMEs (producers, processors, traders, and service providers) have historically been constrained by several problems, including limited size and economies of scale, poor product quality, a lack of diversification and innovation, poor access to credit, cumbersome customs processes, and high costs of associated with agricultural inputs and logistics. These constraints have the combined effect of deterring competitiveness and export growth; utilization of the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) and the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA); and job creation, particularly among women, youth, and persons with disabilities (marginalized populations). The underlying challenges to SME growth and diversification include a struggle to recognize the value of BDS providers’ services due to high costs and a lack of transparent pricing. In parallel, some BDS providers show limited development of needed service offerings, impact measurement, differentiation based on market segment needs, ability to identify customers, and collection capacity. SMEs are often seen as risky investments given that the transaction costs associated providing SMEs with services are high, and that interest also rates are generally high. Women-owned businesses are further burdened due to property ownership, taxes, and other socially driven constraints. Nevertheless, Ghana’s culture of entrepreneurship and initiative, and Ghana’s diverse range of financers, offer an opportunity to incentivize SME growth; create robust and demand driven BDS services; and incentivize investment. DevAfric- GH is currently working with a group of over 230 smallholder women farmers in the Ho West District of the Volta Region of Ghana to get them to “investor readiness” state, with an anticipated grant under this APS.

2. Grains Silo and Related Support for Ho West Smallholder Women Farmers

(Direct Aid Program (DAP), by the Australian High Commission, Accra – Anticipated)

The Direct Aid Program is a flexible, small grants program run directly by the Australian High Commission, Accra. The program aims to support projects that contribute to inclusive, sustainable development and poverty reduction.  The smallholder women farmers of the Ho West District, Volta Region/Ghana fit into the DAP’s aim being that they are disadvantaged mainly because of the following: (a) small sizes of farms – lack of economies of scale, (b) inability to readily access affordable farm equipment and services, (c) inability to access large domestic/international markets for better prices, (d) lack of knowledge about domestic and international requirements i.e. traceability and SPS certification, (e) poor harvest, and (f) lack of innovation and use of technology for efficiency to increase profit margins.

Therefore the Project, under DAP assistance,  seeks to address four of the problems by helping beneficiaries: (1) organize as a group and build their capacity to attain economies of scale, (2) acquire and operate a common silo space that meets domestic and international standards, (3) acquire a farm management software to organize and record all their farming, financial, human resources, etc. data, and (4) with one round of subsidized clearing of farmland.

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1. Defending Workers Rights in Sub-Saharan Africa

(Bureau of Human Rights, Democracy, and Labor, US Department of State – Anticipated)

This Program is a collaboration between trade unions, human rights advocacy organizations and DevAfric-US to train, educate, increase membership in unions and advocate for the rights of workers in Africa, using Ghana and Liberia as initial physical entry point and a Community of Practice’s (CoP) digital platform for continental reach.  The Program’s goal is to effect reforms in labor practices across Sub-Saharan Africa, where workers know their rights, employers respect workers’ rights, relevant laws are enforced, and issues of workers’ rights violations are reduced.

2. Support for Transitional Justice in The Gambia and Liberia

(US Department of State, Office of Global Criminal Justice – Anticipated)

Through this program, GCJ seeks to provide specialized support to address challenges that are common to domestic atrocity crime transitional justice processes and contribute to a holistic transitional justice strategy.The program(s) will build capacity in comparative transitional justice and international human rights, criminal, humanitarian law (IHL), including collecting and preserving evidence in line with relevant “chain of custody” standards. It will also involve other activities that directly support both the education of relevant personnel (including but not limited to, judges, prosecutors, investigators, and civil society organizations) in transitional justice best practices, particularly those geared toward the investigation and prosecution of alleged perpetrators of atrocities.

3. Marine Debris Grants

(The Marine Debris Foundation (MDF) – Anticipated)

The MDF seeks to address the problem of marine debris through diverse partnerships, initiatives, and creative solutions. It prioritizes grantmaking to eliminate marine debris and plastic pollution, and to augment the efforts and impact of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Marine Debris Program.  The MDF’s Grantmaking Initiative is focused on strengthening, enhancing, and improving domestic and international efforts that address the adverse impacts of marine debris on the economy, environment, and/or maritime safety.

Recognizing that over the last few decades, Ghana has become overburdened with marine debris, particularly plastic waste, directly threatening the livelihoods of those who live along the shores and coastlines of the country’s waterbodies, increasing poverty and unemployment – especially among the youth, the MDF grant will assist two local non-governmental organizations (NGOs) (Thinking Minds Ghana and Talent Tahuf Foundation) to remove debris from the shores of the Volta River at Akosombo, the shores of the Keta Lagoon and the Atlantic Ocean at Keta.  The project will also engage in prevention by raising public awareness in those locations about the damage plastic is doing to the environment and the area folks’ own livelihoods.  Traditionally, most of the people in the two areas (Akosombo and Keta) are mainly fisherfolks whose livelihoods depend on the stated water bodies.  Due to the plastics and other debris (i.e. used clothing) choking those water bodies the people’s livelihoods are threatened and youth unemployment is increasing.

WHERE WE WORK

PRIMARILY AFRICA AND USA